Category Archives: Articles

The Lexi Colabianchi School of Weight Plate Management

By | Articles | No Comments

The Lexi Colabianchi School of Weight Plate Management
Written by: Slater Coe

The theory goes like this… if you can’t easily calculate how much you have on the bar, then you won’t be afraid of it. Knowing how much it weighs makes it heavier. So, stack as many 25s, 15s, and 10s on the bar as physically possible. Extend them until the clips only barely hang on. The less you know about the actual weight on the bar, the stronger you can be.

But there are subtle rules. For instance, you can’t stack a 10lb or 15lb plate inside a 25, 35, or 45lb plate. 10 & 15lb plates can be inside of each other, but never of a “colored” plate. The plates are supposed to go from heaviest to lightest, and you can add as many of same weight place as you’d like. Clear as mud?

The Lexi Colabianchi School of Weight Plate Management says combining a 45lb & 5lb plate together weighs waaaay more than combining five 10lb plates. Theoretically, they weigh the same, but in reality, the first version is maybe 400lbs heavier. Give or take.

You too can be a graduate of this illustrious program. You only need the will to stack plates dangerously close to falling off your barbell, and the willingness to ignore your friends shaking their heads at you. May you graduate with honors!

Barbell Training

By | Articles | No Comments

Do you realize how cool it is that you’ve decided to train with a barbell?

94% of everyone you encounter in your daily life is afraid of the barbell for one reason or another… and while they know they should workout 60min/day for 3-4x/week, they don’t.

Another 3% go to a Planet Fitness style gym and get nowhere doing the same boring machines-and-treadmill routine day-in and day-out.

2% percent join some specialty Cardio Lovers class and find out too late that endless cardio has diminishing returns.

So, we guess we’re saying you’re a member of the “Good 1%”. You’re building muscle, which burns more energy and helps you lose body fat. Those new muscles make you better at your everyday life. Placing something heavy on a high shelf? Moving furniture? Cutting up a fallen tree? You can do it all.

How to Use Food to Optimize Recovery

By | Articles | No Comments

How to Use Food to Optimize Recovery
Written by: Coach Slater

TLDR: Protein & Carbs around your workout, Protein & Fats (with some Carbs) at other times of the day.

Protein plays a wide variety of roles in our body from rebuilding muscle tissue to providing the building blocks for various cells, enzymes, and hormones. After a workout, our bodies breakdown old proteins and we need to synthesize new ones to rebuild our muscles. Protein intake varies person to person, but a good starting point for someone who’s active is 0.8-to-1.0 grams per pound of bodyweight. We recommend dividing that amount evenly amongst your meals and snacks for the day. There’s no need to slam a shake post workout (unless you want to!), but do plan to get some protein in with a meal or a snack within a couple hours of a hard training session.

Carbs are what give us energy, and they’re depleted from our bodies, in the form of glycogen, by a workout. Eating carbs pre-workout will give you energy and eating them post workout will replenish your glycogen stores. The amount each person needs varies *greatly* based on how hard you’ve trained, what your goals are, and your physical size. We recommend consuming anywhere from 25-40% of your carbs within the 3 hours prior to your training, and 25-40% of your carbs within the 2 hours after. Fill in the rest of your meals with protein and fats.

So, someone who works out in the morning will have mostly protein and carbs until mid-day and then begin adding fats in and reducing carbs while keeping protein steady throughout the day. A person who works out in the afternoon/evening, would have protein & fats in the morning, reduce fats and add carbs mid-day and post-workout, then add back additional fats prior to bed.

Consistency Trumps All

By | Articles | No Comments

Consistency Trumps All
Written by: Coach Slater

You’ve heard us preach that consistency trumps all. Maybe you’re sick of it. But, we came across a great example that we hope will help you understand it’s importance. Let’s look at two types of people:

“Taylor” decides they’re going to commit to the gym after a whole year of intermittent attendance. So they dive in on Monday, go hard in class for an hour, go to work, and then go out for a 5-mile run later that night. They post a video to their Instagram with #savage underneath, go home and forget to eat dinner, and stay up until 2am watching TV.

Congrats Taylor, you lost two followers and are headed down the road to Burnout Town. What’s the likelihood that Taylor will be back in the gym the next day? Or what if they do and get injured because they’re not taking any time to recover? Their effort is great, but their lack of consistency will make their road tough and unpredictable, likely leading to a plateau or worse, injury.

“Ezekial” takes a different approach. Ezekial is in the gym 4-5 times a week, always makes sure that they’re getting eight hours of sleep, eating nutritious food, and drinking enough water to be fully recovered. All of that is great because Ezekial can come to our classes more, hang out with us, and chip away at their fitness goals every day.

Here’s an example of the overall accumulation of work for Ezekial vs Taylor. Because of Ezekial’s sustainable, consistent approach, they’re able to get to the gym 16-20 times per month. While Taylor, if they’re lucky, will feel “good enough” to get to the gym 8-12 times per month. Over the course of 6 months, that’s approximately 48 more total workouts, which potentially a total of 100,000 more pounds lifted, giving their body 100,001 more reasons to adapt and transform.

Moral of the story — don’t bite off more than you can chew. If you stay consistent, the amount of work will build up and produce results.

Attitude

By | Articles | No Comments

“The longer I live, the more I realize the impact of attitude on life. Attitude, to me, is more important than facts. It is more important than the past, than education, than money, than circumstances, than failures, than successes, than what other people think, say or do. It is more important than appearance, giftedness or skill. It will make or break a company… a church… a home. The remarkable thing is we have a choice every day regarding the attitude we embrace for that day. We cannot change our past… we cannot change the fact that people will act in a certain way. We cannot change the inevitable. The only thing we can do is play the one string we have, and that is our attitude… I am convinced that life is 10% what happens to me and 90% how I react to it. And so it is with you… we are in charge of our Attitudes.”

-Charles Swindoll

Tipping Point

By | Articles | No Comments

“At some point, the pain of not doing it becomes greater than the pain of doing it.” -James Clear

At some point, it’s easier to change than to stay the same. It’s easier to take action and feel insecure at the gym than to sit still and experience self-loathing on the couch. It is easier to feel awkward about learning a barbell movement in a group class than to feel worried or embarrassed at your next doctor’s visit.

Every choice has a price, but when we are motivated, it is easier to bear the inconvenience of action than the pain of remaining the same. Somehow we cross a mental threshold — usually after weeks of procrastination and in the face of an impending deadline — and it becomes more painful to not do the work than to actually do it.

You’re here because you do the work.

No Substitute for Hard Work

By | Articles | No Comments

There’s no substitute for hard work. No amount of supplements, special fad diets, or fancy equipment can get you the results you want.

Much of the progress is done with the basics. Squat, pull, push, and pick up a heavy barbell, dumbbell, or kettlebell. Do that for 3-4 days/week for a few months and then check in with us. Do you love the feeling that this new found strength gives you? We thought you might. Keep doing it.

Next up, get off the processed foods. Buy something real at the grocery, something that grazed the Earth or grew out of the ground. Take it home, cook it, eat it, and when it runs out, go back and buy more. Do that for a few months then let’s see how far you’ve come.

Self-Confidence & Controlled Aggression

By | Articles | No Comments

Self-Confidence & Controlled Aggression
Written by: Coach Slater

When it comes to getting stronger, what’s the role of self-confidence and controlled aggression? Self-confidence is a muscle that we all have that can be strengthened through training, much like physical muscles. Positive thoughts, self-talk, body language, and intensity-control all can bolster your self-confidence.

But, when we say “controlled aggression”, we don’t mean you have to lift angry; and, you don’t need to be an angry person to lift aggressively. But you do need to learn to focus your energy and commitment.

For the laid-back types, you might need to hype yourself up to get enough energy and oomph to lift well. For the anxious ones out there, you can calm yourself into better execution by focusing supremely on the job at hand.

A simple physiological way to psyche yourself up or calm yourself down is by using the breath. Taking a few short breaths (hyperventilating) will psych you UP. Take slow deep breathes will calm you DOWN. Next time you’re lifting heavy, try a rep preceded by long, slow breaths. Next, try a rep preceded by quick, short breaths. Note the difference.

Best Hour of Your Day

By | Articles | No Comments

Back in the day, we used to make fun of the concept of “Group Classes”. Why would I need a Coach to tell me what to do? And isn’t it weird working out with others? Turns out, you make the most improvements when training with a group, and you have the most fun when working out with team. And that’s what Derby City is… a team working together.

Show up to any Coach’s class and you’ll receive a similar experience. As a group, we warm-up together, practice a basic movement or skill, work through a Strength component for the day, discuss and critique the athletes’ efforts or technique, and then pound out an intense conditioning piece. And we do it all within an hour so people can get to work, home, or outside to enjoy the rest of their day.

It’s the best hour of your day.

Eating on Vacation

By | Articles | No Comments

We know many DCCF-ers use the July 4th weekend for a quick summer vacation. Maybe you’re unsure what to do about your nutrition plan while traveling?

Coach Evan hitting you with some advice that can, hopefully, relieve some stress so you can enjoy yourself, while still mindfully eating.