Category Archives: Articles

Tip: Adjustable Pullup Bars

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Our new Bridge Fitness rig features adjustable pullup bars, which means you can change their height for use in scaling pushups, bar muscle-ups, horizontal rows, etc…

Coach Dex hits you with a quick tutorial on moving and setting these in place for your next WOD.

Ski Erg Tips

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With 10 new Ski Ergs at Derby City, there are many questions about how best to utilize them.

Coach Dex hits you with some tips. Make sure you initiate the pull by driving your hips back. Keep your core engaged as you drive, and let your arms finish the movement. Lastly, don’t forget to breathe!

Video Tip: Lateral Banded Plate Walk

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Video Tip: Lateral Banded Plate Walk

This scale doesn’t necessarily have a “skill transfer” to handstand walking, but it does make you work extremely hard and you’ll feel the burn in your shoulders. So, we put it for our “Life” programming for members who just want a kickass workout and aren’t worried about getting upside down. But, like any movement, there are tips which make it better for developing those mirror muscles, and make you better at other movements in the gym.

Assault Bike Etiquette

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Assault Bike Etiquette

There are simple etiquette rules you can follow to help sustain the life of an Assault Bikes.

In short?
1. Never stand, get on, or get off with all of your weight on one pedal. Use the posts for getting on & getting off, and stay seated while you workout.
2. Move the bike by the back-frame; don’t transport it via the handle bars.

This Is Derby City CrossFit

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We’re in the business of creating a great gym culture consisting of tough workouts, expert coaching, and overall good vibes. We’re genuine in our interest in *your* fitness and attentive to *your* needs.

This is Derby City CrossFit.

Post “Murph” Feels

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Not every day has to be a barn-burner. Some days, you just need to *move*, knock the rust off, and share a few high-fives. Those days are good for long-term growth.

There’s simply no way to train five or six days a week with high intensity. The answer is mix up your intensity and follow a high/low type system. Try upping your training frequency while simultaneously decreasing how hard you’re training on some of those days.

You’re just not going to have the same intensity on the day after something like “Murph”. On those days, we encourage you to come in, even if you’re sore, and just go thru the motions. Moving will help you feel better for the following day, so you’re ready to bring your best effort.

Decoding: Cage Free vs. Free Range vs. Pasture Raised Eggs

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Decoding: Cage Free vs. Free Range vs. Pasture Raised Eggs
Written by: Coach Slater

With the exception of “Pasture Raised”, most everything written on the side of an egg carton is a marketing ploy by the egg industry to sell you crappy eggs. So, let’s quickly summarize the differences in these terms so you can make an educated buying decision.

Cage Free
This term means that the chickens were not in cases. They can still be confined in very close quarters inside a building where they are, literally, standing in their sh*t and can barely move. They have little or no access to the outdoors.

Free Range
This term means that the chickens were allowed “access” to the outside with no specifications as the quality or the duration of that outside exposure. So unfortunately, this term is mostly used where the chickens are crammed in large warehouses that have a small door on one end that opens to a few feet of outside dirt space. Most of the chickens never even know that door exists and couldn’t get there even if they wanted to.

Vegetarian Fed
This is a newer term that is appearing on egg cartons. When I first read it, I thought, “Cool. The chickens must be fed a healthy blend of vegetable and grains.” But then it dawns on me… a chicken is a natural carnivore, as explained below. It likes to eat bugs and insects. A “vegetarian raised” chicken was completely raised on industrialized feed and was never allowed outside. Avoid these eggs.

Organic
Organic doesn’t mean what it used to mean. Organic eggs must come from chickens that live in cage free environments, like mentioned above, so they have access to the outdoors, but they likely aren’t able to utilize it. To qualify as organic, eggs must come from chickens that are fed only organic feed (free of animal by-products, synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, GMOs, or other chemical additives), given antibiotics only in the event of an infection, and are free of hormones or other drugs. But, in general, these aren’t the eggs you’re looking for because they fall into that cage free category, unless stated otherwise.

Pasture Raised
Although there aren’t any regulations on this term, currently, it’s being used by sustainable farmers to mean chickens raised in the outdoors. Pasture-raised chickens have access to outdoor pasture, with fresh greens such as clover or grass, and plenty of insects to supplement their diet. Chickens are omnivores and eat worms, grubs, mealworms, beetles, grasshoppers, crickets, ticks, spiders and even mice, moles, and small snakes. Their eggs have a deep-orange yolk indicating they came from a chicken that ate a well balanced and healthy diet, and thus has excellent nutritional value. This is what you want to buy if you are shopping for eggs (and can afford it).

Reference:
Growing a Greener World

Light at the End of the Tunnel

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Derby City, you’ve created something special here. And thru the crammed classes and logistical “unpleasantness”, you’ve been gracious with our growing pains. You’ve been patient and positive, and it hasn’t gone unnoticed. We’re extremely grateful for the Derby City fam.

Our expansion is a mere week away. We can see the light at the end of the tunnel. Thank you for smiling thru the headaches.

A Tennis Ball? In the Chalk Bucket??

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A Tennis Ball? In the Chalk Bucket??
Written by: Coach Slater

How we love thee, chalk. You make barbells and pullup bars so much grippier. You keep kettlebells in our grasp for reps upon reps. You give us a reason to waste time as we re-chalk our hands in the middle of a WOD. Chalk is rad.

However, just like anything rad, too much of a good thing can actually be bad. A light dusting on the hands will help for sure; but, if you continue to load up on the chalk and it gets thick on your hands, once you mix in a little sweat, it turns to paste. What once was a light dusting has now become a source of friction on your hands. It’s too much. Our experience is that folks who tend to tear will load up on the white stuff thinking it will make them not tear. But then they tear. So they use more. And tear again, and so on. It’s a vicious cycle.

The other group of folks who tend to over-chalk are those who visit the chalk bucket as a rest break during the WOD. Also not ideal.

So today, we want to introduce you to the tennis balls you’re now finding in our chalk buckets. Consider using one to apply the perfect amount of *dusting* on your hands. Also think about chalking up less often, like maybe every 2 or 3 rounds, instead of *every* round and see what happens. And, if you’re prone to tearing, manage your calluses at home or buy some grips.

And if you disregard all of these suggestions and end up leaving a puddle of chalk paste on the bar and the floor, please clean it up!

Last, but not least, we’ve gotta thank our friends at Butchertown CrossFit for this idea. Our athletes visited there for the Cleaver Classic competition a few weeks back, and they mentioned finding a tennis ball in the chalk buckets. They experimented with using the ball to apply chalk and were pleasantly surprised at how well it coated their grips. So, thanks gang!

Female Athletes

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Sure, the women of the CrossFit Games are impressive, but have you seen the female athletes of Derby City CrossFit?

They hold down full-time jobs and family responsibilities, yet still find time for themselves to workout. They know that getting and staying fit is one of the best ways to perform their jobs well and be present for their families.

And they aren’t afraid to build a little muscle, because they love how it makes them feel. Here, they change the way they think about their bodies. They’ve removed the “what ifs” in their minds, and now think “why not”. Those muscles and callused hands represent hard work.